The Composer

I finally finished the commissioned portrait for Stephen Pikarsky (from All Keyed Up Media).  He’s been a huge help to me in some personal projects and did the original score for the Island the Plough App (which is still, slowly, slowly happening).  It was a lot of fun to do this project and it inspired me to do a series of them.  This, being “The Composer,” I am hoping to also do “The Writer,” “The Dancer,” “The Singer,” and “The Painter” to sort of round out the various artist/creator profiles.

the composer illustration illustrator black and white pen and ink vest glasses papers musical score keys piano keys falling apart floating ink wash splatter spatter splash messy sharp style design sketchbookjack jack kasprzak stephen pikarsky stylized

Inktober: The Headless Horseman

This year for #Inktober I decided to try and tell a story over the course the month, one day at a time. This is the Real story behind the Headless Horseman. Follow along on SketchbookJack’s Instagram.

Good evening, dear readers, I am your storyteller. Follow along this #inktober for the revealing of the real story of the headless horseman. Each day one panel of the story will be revealed.

The Island and the Plough: Teaser Trailer 1

If you have been wondering where I have been, I have been busy busy busy, toiling away to bring “The Island and the Plough” to interactive ebook iPad app form.  It will have originally composed music created by the professional concert pianist, Stephen Pikarsky and will be narrated by the incredibly talented (and soon to be published, himself) Bill Townley.  This is not to mention that the illustrations from the book will come to life with interactive physics, graphical words that react to touch, and additional animations that will bring the characters to life.   Once we launch this and get it off the ground, I will be going to Kickstarter to ask for some additional funds to get the physical book printed.  This will be a somewhat different take on the kickstarter platform, as the work is already done, and there will already be a product to buy (the App) if you aren’t terribly interested in funding Kickstarter.  However, if you are interested in supporting my future work, or just want to get your hands on the physical book, you can kick in (essentially pre-order) the book.  If we reach the goal, it will allow us to get the large quantity of books printed at a price reasonable for you!

So stay tuned, the App will be released in the coming weeks and the Kickstarter to get “The Island and the Plough” prints will follow immediately after.  In the meantime, chew on this trailer for a bit!

iPad App is Coming!

 

 

There is big news for SketchbookJack.  An interactive iPad ebook app is currently in the works.  The first app will be “The Island and the Plough.”  All the bold, black and white illustrations will come to life with animations, a narrator, and even an apple-catching mini-game.  I don’t want to spoil too much, so stay tuned and I’ll post a few more screenshots.
ebook childrens book iPad epub black and white bold typography interactive style cartoon illustration art design layout mockup screenshot tree apple words reading design app

ebook childrens book iPad epub black and white bold typography interactive style cartoon illustration art design layout mockup screenshot tree apple words reading design  app

Captain and Crow’s ABCs

Here is a sneak peak of my latest book project. I am working on finding an agent and pitching around “The Island and the Plough” but I am continuing to build up other projects, because there are plenty more to come.

Here we have “Captain and Crow’s ABCs”.  The Captain finds a smart Crow who challenges him to to a test.  First he is asked if he knows his ABCs, to which the Captain replies “ARR!” only to be followed by asking what his favorite letter is.  Of course, it is R.  The crow challenges him to name a word for every letter in the alphabet that has an R sound in it.  Here, the Captain is almost stumped by the letter I, and  much confusion arises between I, eye and aye.

captain crow pirate matey arrr funny humor black and white abc childrens book layout design characters illustration cartoon comic raven letters learning education sketchbookjack art insides anatomy pen and ink bold design

Captain is almost stumped with I, but then he finds a word that has an ARRRRR in it.

Cats Are Aliens

For those of you who have been following me for a long time, you may remember the “Cats Are Aliens” doodles I did on napkins or perhaps you have seen them popping up on Instagram. I found those drawings, scanned them and gave them some new life. I’ll continue to collect them here in this gallery as I finish each one. Enjoy!

40 Mobsters for The Daily Mobster

Who knew I could make it this far with just a silly mobster theme?  I have to admit that I worried, I cried, I even confessed to “Mad Ma” Johnson that early on,  I would run out of ideas and she might have to break my knuckles.  But, I am quickly finding out that just about anything can be turned into a goofy character; I mean, there is a character based entirely off of neckties, and looks like a necktie!   The Daily Mobster has just reached 40 mobsters and is quickly nearly the 50 mark!  I have a special announcement to make when we reach 50 so make sure to stay tuned, and share with a friend.  New readers are always welcome and if you have ideas, thoughts or comments, share them!  Thank you all for the following and support.

mobsters process sketching table at work drawing inking cartoon illustration photo mobsters characters design

Flashback: Fluid

benjamin_madame_Lynch_sketchbookjack_children_book_page_layout_ink_fluid_nanny_illustration

Madame Lynch appears at the Brigham's front door.

Illustration Friday’s topic popped up as “Fluid” and I immediately thought of a past project I was working on about three years ago.  The villains in the story shed off black, inky, fluid as they moved about.  Unfortunately, this was one of those projects I just had to let die as, every time I sat down to work on it I drew a blank and struggled endlessly trying to achieve what I wanted.  It definitely taught me how to learn to let something die.  I have to admit that I really want to complete this project, but am not regretful that I dropped it.  It allowed me to clear my head and start over on several other projects since.  I still love the story and the concept, so I am sure I will return to it in the future.   The manuscript actually came together quite nicely with the exception of one plot hole, as did some of the initial pencils of each page.  But, when I sat down to some of the very important page layouts, to finish the ink for each page, or do the final treatments (and this book had a lot of “effects” involved) it just never looked the way I wanted it to and unfortunately the mood and plot of the story relied very heavily on the visuals.  I hope to add it back into my queue of projects sometime.

The basic set up for this page is that Benjamin Brigham is a rotter and just a really nasty little child.  He plays horribly (really horrible, some times life threatening ;p ) pranks on people, is grouchy and grumpy, and puts up a fight to nearly anything his parents or teachers wish him to do.  After being thrown from several schools and scaring away countless nannies and sitters, his parents receive a letter in the mail regarding the most prestigious academy for troubled youth that guarantees perfect results.  Madame Lynch, the administrator of the academy has come to collect young Benjamin.

The Island and the Plough : Contact Sheets

island_plough_contact_book_sketchbookjack_illustration_layout_story_boards

I am quite excited to say that I am nearing the very last stage of “The Island and the Plough.”  Editing and formatting proves to be quite an arduous process.  I had a first round of contact sheets proof-printed and had a few people review them.  One person in particular who is a writer/director (on the film side of things) had some really great final editorial remarks.  I decided to take a few into account and rework some small things here and there, adding one extra idea right at the climax of the story which I think will really accentuate the central tone and punctuate the climax better than what I had.

Here is my nearly completed, revised set of contact sheets.  I apologize for making them so small, but being so near completion of this project, I still don’t want to give away the story.  But there is something very interesting about viewing the pages at this size.  It gives a very clear sense of the progression of tone, contrast and balance, not to mention a great macro view of each page’s composition.  It brings the process to a full circle back to a “storyboard” format to really review it once again.

I am still in the throes of deciding how exactly to distribute this project as contacting/meeting with agents and publishers is a very slow process.  Many of the people I have talked with, even in the publishing industry, still suggest self publishing.  At some point I will be doing a small run of prints for proofing purposes as well as for family and friends, which I will make available to sale.