Git Yer Copy Mateys

ARR! After many battles, a bad case of scurvy, and a long awaited journey over ragin’ seas, the many boxes of treasure doth arrived at me doorstoop. “Captain and Crow’s ABCs” be available for purchase, mateys! Git Learned!

sketchbookjack.bigcartel.com or sketchbookjack.com

Captain and Crow's ABCs childrens education book learning funny humor design art illustration black and white ink pirate captain crow matey stripes letters boat ship R favorite jack kasprzak sketchbookjack typography bold layout design book publishing print clever graphic karate jar art bars innards laugh silly kids children Captain and Crow's ABCs childrens education book learning funny humor design art illustration black and white ink pirate captain crow matey stripes letters boat ship R favorite jack kasprzak sketchbookjack typography bold layout design book publishing print clever graphic karate jar art bars innards laugh silly kids children Captain and Crow's ABCs childrens education book learning funny humor design art illustration black and white ink pirate captain crow matey stripes letters boat ship R favorite jack kasprzak sketchbookjack typography bold layout design book publishing print clever graphic karate jar art bars innards laugh silly kids children

It was a long a trying ride but I had a lot of fun doing it.  I’ve learned a lot from the process of making this book, so I can move on to the next project with more insight.  I hope it can bring a couple of smiles to faces.
Captain and Crow's ABCs childrens education book learning funny humor design art illustration black and white ink pirate captain crow matey stripes letters boat ship R favorite jack kasprzak sketchbookjack typography bold layout design book publishing print clever graphic karate jar art bars innards laugh silly kids children typography

Inktober: The Headless Horseman

This year for #Inktober I decided to try and tell a story over the course the month, one day at a time. This is the Real story behind the Headless Horseman. Follow along on SketchbookJack’s Instagram.

Good evening, dear readers, I am your storyteller. Follow along this #inktober for the revealing of the real story of the headless horseman. Each day one panel of the story will be revealed.

Another Dead Soldier

I have killed another soldier, a faithful old pen.  He was but a commoner yet filled a many jacket, blackened a many hat, and darkened a many tie.  Yes, I use a Sharpie, sometimes, for inking.  I know it is not preferred and you may already be furling your brow at the low manner in which I behave but I have come to like the Sharpie.  It is simple and consistent and widely available.  I can carry them in a bag and are great for travel or quick works.  I know my dirty, low class pen will never survive the test of time without any “archival quality” ink.  It will wither and fade in the brash sunlight of west Los Angeles, but I don’t care, for it is a impotent artist who requires special tools.  It is a sad artist who blames his tools.  I too, once brandished a fancy Moleskine notebook of which holds glorious, legendary powers in hopes to harness the same genius that bled from Hemingway’s veins, hoping it would make my work magical.  I too, once carried the famed Micron pen and the Staedler pencils, because no actual artist would dare carry (dare not say use) an unbranded, hideously yellow, #2 pencil of which is not even worthy of using the HB insider lingo.  Alas, I still use India Ink, metal tip pens, and brushes but for most everyday workings I have squandered such dreams of Hemingway and draw many of my characters on the forbidden copy paper of which a common, gasp, digital printer might use.  Sure, judgments are passed, scoffs and tisks are handed by those in the supply store.  But I have work to do, dear critic; I have not time to wander the supply store in search of the lesser user of commoner tools I feel may need a lecture.  Unfurl your brow, fellow inker, embrace your unorthodox use of illegitimate tools.